Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item:https://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12259/91019
Type of publication: Konferencijų tezės nerecenzuojamuose leidiniuose / Conference theses in non-peer-reviewed publications (T2)
Field of Science: Agronomija / Agronomy (A001)
Author(s): Jarienė, Elvyra
Title: New trends of management in the chain of food quality and safety
Is part of: International Scientific Conference "New trends in Food safety and quality" NIFSA 2017, 5 - 7 October 2017, Aleksandras Stulgiskis University, Lithuania. Akademija, 2017
Extent: p. 15-16
Date: 2017
Keywords: modern consumer;pesticides poisoning;soil degradation;sustainable farming
ISBN: 9786094491207
Abstract: In the high-level Event, (12-13 October 2016, Brussels FOOD 2030: Research & Innovation for Tomorrow's Nutrition & Food Systems) one of the identified Food and Nutrition Security priorities was CLIMATE – the use of smart and environmentally sustainable food systems. In this context the natural resources (water, soil, land and sea) should be used sustainably within the planetary boundaries, so it could be available to future generations. The causes of soil destruction include chemical-heavy farming techniques, deforestation which increases erosion, and global warming. The earth under our feet is too often ignored by policymakers. "Soils are the basis of life," said Semedo, FAO's deputy director general of natural resources. "Ninety five percent of our food comes from the soil." Unless new approaches are adopted, the global amount of arable and productive land per person in 2050 will be only a quarter of the level in 1960, the FAO reported, due to growing populations and soil degradation. Soils play a key role in absorbing carbon and filtering water but soil destruction creates a vicious cycle, in which less carbon is stored, the world gets hotter, and the land is further degraded. Widely divergent standards of production, use and protection from hazardous pesticides in different countries are creating double standards, which are having a serious impact on human rights (Special Rapporteurs Hilal Elver, Baskut Tuncak GENEVA, 7 March 2017). The Special Rapporteurs pointed to research showing that pesticides were responsible for an estimated 200,000 acute poisoning deaths each year. The overwhelming number of fatalities, some 99%, occurred in developing countries where health, safety and environmental regulations were weaker. Chronic exposure to pesticides has been linked to cancer, Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s diseases, hormone disruption, developmental disorders and sterility. Farmers and agricultural workers, communities living near plantations
Internet: https://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12259/91019
Affiliation(s): Vytauto Didžiojo universitetas
Žemės ūkio akademija
Appears in Collections:Universiteto mokslo publikacijos / University Research Publications

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