Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item:https://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12259/53030
Type of publication: Tezės Clarivate Analytics Web of Science ar/ir Scopus / Theses in Clarivate Analytics Web of Science and/or Scopus DB (T1a)
Field of Science: Ekologija ir aplinkotyra / Ecology and environmental sciences (N012)
Author(s): Robinson, Oliver;Tamayo-Uria, Ibon;Aasvang, Gunn Marit;Castro, Montserrat de;Dėdelė, Audrius;Giorgis-Allemand, Lise;Gražulevičienė, Regina;Iakovides, Minas;Kampouri, Mariza;Krog, Norun;Chatzi, Leda;McEachan, Rosie;Slama, Rémy;Valentín, Antònia;Wright, John;Vrijheid, Martine;Nieuwenhuijsen, Mark J;Basagana, Xavier
Title: The outdoor exposome during pregnancy and its social determinants
Is part of: Environmental health perspectives. EHP : 28th annual conference International Society for Environmental epidemiology "Old and new risks: challenges for environmental epidemiology", Rome, Italy, 1–4 September 2016 : abstracts. Rome : International Society for Environmental Epidemiology (ISEE), 2016, 2016, vol. x, supll
Extent: p. 252-252
Date: 2016
Note: Abstract Number: P1-252 | ID: 4419
Keywords: Outdoor exposome;Human health;Eurpean project
Abstract: Background: We define the 'Outdoor Exposome' as the complex mixture of environmental factors that individuals are exposed to in the outdoor environment, which may be determined by socio-demographic factors. It is hypothesized that more disadvantaged social groups are more exposed to environmental hazards resulting in health inequalities. AIMS: To describe the outdoor exposome and its socio-demographic determinants among pregnant women living in nine cities across Europe. Methods: We included 28,710 pregnant women enrolled in six birth cohorts participating in the EC FP-7 HELIX project. Using GIS, we assessed exposure over pregnancy to 26 exposures at the home address including air pollutants, noise, meteorological factors, and natural and built environment characteristics and performed a principal component (PC) analysis. The association between each exposure and ethnicity and education level (low, medium, high) was assessed by within city regression. Results: 3 PCs explained over 50% of variation. Latitude and ‘urbanisation’ could account for observed PC loadings. Meta-analyses showed that higher education levels was associated with exposure to lower level of air pollutants (PM2.5: β = -1.12, 95% C.I.: -1.50; -0.13) and noise (β = -1.30, 95% C.I.: -0.23; -0.03), greater surrounding green space (Normalized difference vegetation index within 100m : β = 0.005, 95% C.I.: 0.003; 0.007), and lower street connectivity (within 100m : β = -3.90, 95% C.I.: -125; -81). Those of native country ethnicity were similarly less likely to be exposed to harmful environments. However there was significant heterogeneity between cities: e.g. higher education was associated with greater NO2 levels in Sabadell, Spain and lower levels in Bradford, UK . Conclusions: Pregnant women from more disadvantaged social groups are more exposed to unhealthy urban environments within some European cities, which may impact on the development of their children
Internet: http://ehp.niehs.nih.gov/isee/2016-p1-252-4419/
http://ehp.niehs.nih.gov/isee/2016-p1-252-4419/
Affiliation(s): Aplinkotyros katedra
Gamtos mokslų fakultetas
Vytauto Didžiojo universitetas
Appears in Collections:Universiteto mokslo publikacijos / University Research Publications

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