Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item:https://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12259/50942
Type of publication: Straipsnis kituose recenzuojamuose leidiniuose / Article in other peer-reviewed editions (S5)
Field of Science: Filosofija / Philosophy (H001)
Author(s): Gordon, John-Stewart
Title: Ancient ethics and modern morality
Is part of: Internet encyclopedia of philosophy IEP [elektroninis išteklius] / editor James Fieser. Non-profit organization, 2013, 2013
Extent: p. 1-19
Date: 2013
Keywords: Ethics;Ancient ethics;Morality;Modern morality
Abstract: It is commonly supposed that there is a vital difference between ancient ethics and modern morality. For example, there appears to be a vital difference between virtue ethics and the modern moralities of deontological ethics (Kantianism) and consequentialism (utilitarianism). At second glance, however, one acknowledges that both ethical approaches have more in common than their stereotypes may suggest. Oversimplification, fallacious interpretations, as well as a broad variation within a particular ethical theory make it in general harder to determine the real differences and similarities between ancient ethics and modern morality. But why should we bother about ancient ethics at all? What is the utility of comparing the strengths and weaknesses of the particular approaches? The general answer is that a proper understanding of the strengths and weaknesses of virtue ethics and modern moral theories can be used to overcome current ethical problems and to initiate fruitful developments in ethical reasoning and decision-making. This article examines the differences and similarities between ancient ethics and modern morality by analysing and comparing their main defining features in order to show that the two ethical approaches are less distinct than one might suppose. The first part of the article outlines the main ethical approaches in Ancient Greek ethics by focusing on the Cynics, the Cyrenaics, Aristotle’s virtue ethics, the Epicureans, and the Stoics. This part also briefly outlines the two leading modern ethical approaches, that is, Kantianism and utilitarianism, in more general terms in order to provide a sufficient background. The second part provides a detailed table with the main defining features of the conflicting stereotypes of ancient ethics and modern morality.[...]
Internet: http://www.iep.utm.edu/
Affiliation(s): Humanitarinių mokslų fakultetas
Vytauto Didžiojo universitetas
Appears in Collections:Universiteto mokslo publikacijos / University Research Publications

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