Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item:https://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12259/45506
Type of publication: Tezės Clarivate Analytics Web of Science ar/ir Scopus / Theses in Clarivate Analytics Web of Science and/or Scopus DB (T1a)
Field of Science: Biochemija / Biochemistry (N004)
Author(s): Mikalayeva, Valeryia;Daugelavičius, Rimantas
Title: Studies of multidrug efflux pump activity in Lactococcus lactis using ethidium cations
Is part of: FEBS journal. Oxford : Wiley, 2012, Vol. 279, suppl. 1
Extent: p. 259-259
Date: 2012
Note: Abstract of special issue: 22nd IUBMB & 37th FEBS Congress, Seville, Spain, September 4-9, 2012
Keywords: Bakterijos;Lactococcus lactis;Daugiavaistis atsparumas;Multidrug resistance;Lactococcus lactis
Abstract: Multidrug resistance (MDR) efflux pump is the main reason of bacteria resistance to antibiotics. Lactococcus lactis is very important bacterium in food industry. We used spectrofluorimetric measurments to assay the activity of MDR pumps and to investigate the response of the pumps to cell growth conditions. We used ethidium (Et) as as indicatory compound, which increases its fluorescence because of the binding to DNA. We also used another MDR pump substrate tetraphenylphosphonium (TPP+ ) as a competitive compound and antibiotic gramicidin D as the cell permeabilizer. In this study we demonstrated that the differences in MDR efflux pump activity depend on the growth conditions (with or without heme source) and the energetic state of cells
Internet: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1742-4658.2010.08705.x/pdf
Affiliation(s): Biochemijos katedra
Gamtos mokslų fakultetas
Vytauto Didžiojo universitetas
Appears in Collections:Universiteto mokslo publikacijos / University Research Publications

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